Bit Rot

Valentino Bellini

2014-03-28

BIT ROT PROJECT.
Bit rot is a colloquial term used in the computerized information systems environment to indicate the gradually decaying of data stored on storage medias or software over the duration of time. In this case, the concept is transposed from a virtual reality, made of bit and software, to a material one, made of real people, things and places. This reality is the research subject of the BITROT Project. Through photographic documentation, the project follows the international...

BIT ROT PROJECT.<br />
Bit rot is a colloquial term used in the computerized information systems environment to indicate the gradually decaying of data stored on storage medias or software over the duration of time. In this case, the concept is transposed from a virtual reality, made of bit and software, to a material one, made of real people, things and places. This reality is the research subject of the BITROT Project. Through photographic documentation, the project follows the international movements of the e-waste, providing evidence of illegal commerce and disposal and tells the stories of those who are involved, but also underlines green and sustainable alternatives that in many countries have already been adopted. Electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) is growing faster than any other type of waste. With an annual volume that goes between 40 and 50 million metric tons, according to the UNEP (United Nation Environment Program), the growing amount of e-waste could grow exponentially, as much as 500 times over the coming decade, especially in countries like India, China and some African regions where the technology industry is growing fast. It is hazardous waste, containing dozens of substances dangerous to human health and the environment; it is hard to be sustainably disposed of and it needs a costly processing technique to make it recyclable. This is the reason why about 80% of the e-waste produced in developed countries (North America and Europe on the top of the list) is not disposed of in situ, but shipped, most of the time illegally, to developing countries on cargo ships, where it is illegally disposed of. The Basel Convention, adopted on 22 March 1989 and entered into force in 5 May 1992, lays down rules to control, at an international level, transboundary movements of hazardous wastes and their disposal, including electrical and electronic waste. However, despite this useful instrument, the international regulation is not effective enough to fight the criminal organizations that gain great profit in moving the materials internationally. This research is inspired by this important, practical problem, represented by the e-waste and focuses on the extreme consumerism of the society we live in. A society that keeps hostage modern slaves, forced to live and work in detrimental conditions and that at same time, keeps itself as a hostage, always looking for technological and innovative products to satisfy its own need of being fast and competitive. A society where the consumer does not acknowledge boredom and his culture avoids it. Where there is not happiness and the moments of happiness are when we satisfy our impelling needs, careless of acknowledging that our choices have an impact on the life of those that have no choice. Visit bitrotproject.tumblr.com

Selling Spring: Sex Workers Series

James Delano

2014-03-28

Selling Spring: Sex Workers Series.
Selling Spring, or "Baishun" in Japanese, reflects age-old attitudes towards prostitution, a form of servitude. It is simply impossible to make generalizations about this subject. Usually, the deeper the poverty, the higher the likelihood that young women, and sometimes young men, will wind up in this dangerous profession. Quite often they are coerced or betrayed by a perceived friend or even a relative in whom misplaced trust results in a...

Selling Spring: Sex Workers Series.<br />
Selling Spring, or &quot;Baishun&quot; in Japanese, reflects age-old attitudes towards prostitution, a form of servitude.  It is simply impossible to make generalizations about this subject.  Usually, the deeper the poverty, the higher the likelihood that young women, and sometimes young men, will wind up in this dangerous profession.  Quite often they are coerced or betrayed by a perceived friend or even a relative in whom misplaced trust results in a form of bondage, though this is not always the case. Even in Thailand which has made great economic strides over the last thirty years, prostitution is still prevalent and Patpong and Pattaya are still synonymous with the sex industry. In Japan, &ldquo;enjo-kosai&rdquo;, or compensation dating, where Japanese men meet and pay young women and girls from the urban middle class for sex on a &lsquo;date&rsquo;, is still a problem. In the case of Japan, poverty does not even enter into the equation.  In 2007, I was in Southern California.  At this time I began to break through barriers, I went to places with various degrees of civil conflict like Yemen, Afghanistan, Kashmir, and the southern Philippines, places most people avoid.  I had encountered street prostitutes called &ldquo;Paraditas&rdquo;, doing a story along the Mexican border the year before. There was an area, Zona Norte, immediately across the border in Tijuana, Mexico where prostitution was tolerated. Women largely worked autonomously on the streets.  Police were everywhere arresting men.  I became fascinated by this sub-culture. I speak Spanish fluently and soon found out that these were ordinary women, often single mothers, who could adequately support their children no other way than on the streets. When I finished that series, I was determined to extend this project beyond Tijuana and look inside this subculture as widely as I could.  When approaching the sex industry, there is risk in every direction, from the men who closely monitor the women and from the police, even if women are working autonomously or semi-autonomously. Because of this moving quietly and working quickly is key in my work.  This may not always by evident in the actual portrait, which may have been made in a session with a woman for an extended period of time, but I definitely arrive unannounced, photograph and leave quietly when finished. I need to enter their world, unchanged, no show for the lens. To represent the truth of their world and to show the way that these women hang onto the frayed threads of their dignity, I knew I would have to attract as little attention as  possible.  I did not touch these women, I did not care about photographing them engaging a client, their clients did not interest me. I wanted to connect with each woman&rsquo;s humanity, her form; no judgement and not much explanation. I wanted to take the viewer with me, and allow them fill in the narrative. What interests me is the woman behind this persona that is created for men&rsquo;s sexual appetite. Each woman is someone&rsquo;s sister, daughter, maybe even someone&rsquo;s mother.  There is this uniform, bare-lightbulb squalor in their world. There is wear on the soul and a desire for compassion, and a little respect. It is a heavy burden to keep their work a secret, if they have chosen not to reveal it. There is often fear, though I am mindful to try and enter situations where each woman is making her own decision whether or not to be photographed. My work is a search for dignity in the spiritual squalor.

Brera

Federico Ciamei

2014-03-28

Brera Academy of Fine Arts, founded in 1776 in a centuries old palace in Milan, is one of the oldest in Italy. The main courses are painting, sculpture, decoration and scenic design. Despite the cultural decline of Italy’s recent history, Brera Academy is one of the few italian academic institutions that attracts foreign students, more than 25% of them come from overseas.

Brera Academy of Fine Arts, founded in 1776 in a centuries old palace in Milan, is one of the oldest in Italy. The main courses are painting, sculpture, decoration and scenic design. Despite the cultural decline of Italy&rsquo;s recent history, Brera Academy is one of the few italian academic institutions that attracts foreign students, more than 25% of them come from overseas.

The Butler Aacademy

Capucine Bailly / Cosmos

2014-03-28

The International Butler Academy mission is to educate, prepare, and coach dedicated individuals in order to become professionals in the True Art of Service and house management. It provides its graduates with the best possible qualifications for entering the butling and private service profession.

The International Butler Academy mission is to educate, prepare, and coach dedicated individuals in order to become professionals in the True Art of Service and house management. It provides its graduates with the best possible qualifications for entering the butling and private service profession.

Stumble in the Jungle

Espen Rasmussen / Panos

2014-03-28

When does the pain start? Norwegian runner Bernt Arne Tvedt (34) starts to feel it 3 km into gruelling 254 km Amazon Jungle Marathon in Brazil. It starts with a cramp in one leg, then cramps in the other. By the time he is able to stop and stretch, ants start crawling up his legs. This brings first embarrassment, then fear. On the ground there are scorpions and poisonous snakes in the trees while the many rivers the runners have to cross are infested with piranhas. The pain is making Bernt...

When does the pain start? Norwegian runner Bernt Arne Tvedt (34) starts to feel it 3 km into gruelling 254 km Amazon Jungle Marathon in Brazil. It starts with a cramp in one leg, then cramps in the other. By the time he is able to stop and stretch, ants start crawling up his legs. This brings first embarrassment, then fear. On the ground there are scorpions and poisonous snakes in the trees while the many rivers the runners have to cross are infested with piranhas. The pain is making Bernt Arnes body shake. 'I think I will have to retire' he says and starts crying. CNN has dubbed this marathon 'the world's toughest endurance race.'

Camden

Kevin Downs / Cosmos

2014-03-28

Camden, New Jersey is one of the most dangerous cities in the Unites States. When Kevin Downs went there, early 2013, Camden was in the midst of dissolving its city police force in favor of a countywide police agency. They found a city that is inhabited by hard-working citizens that are fighting a battle against corrupt city officials and drug dealers that call Camden the heroine highway of the United States. People live in extreme poverty, with a death toll by violent crime that is the highest...

Camden, New Jersey is one of the most dangerous cities in the Unites States. When Kevin Downs went there, early 2013, Camden was in the midst of dissolving its city police force in favor of a countywide police agency. They found a city that is inhabited by hard-working citizens that are fighting a battle against corrupt city officials and drug dealers that call Camden the heroine highway of the United States. People live in extreme poverty, with a death toll by violent crime that is the highest of any city of North America, even surpassing Detroit as one of the most violent cities of the US in 2012, according to FBI data by CQ Press.

Kiev 2014

Andy Rocchelli / Cesura

2014-02-28

Three months of largely protests came to a bloody head this week as thousands of riot police attacked a protest camp in Kiev, Ukraine, resulting in clashes and gunfire that left at least 100 people dead and 571wounded. After days of bloodshed, the government of President Viktor F. Yanukovych said negotiators had agreed to an initial deal to “settle the crisis,” without elaborating. The president was later reported to say he would call early elections.

Three months of largely protests came to a bloody head this week as thousands of riot police attacked a protest camp in Kiev, Ukraine, resulting in clashes and gunfire that left at least 100 people dead and 571wounded. After days of bloodshed, the government of President Viktor F. Yanukovych said negotiators had agreed to an initial deal to &ldquo;settle the crisis,&rdquo; without elaborating. The president was later reported to say he would call early elections.

A rwandan fate

Christophe Calais/Signatures

2014-02-27

Photos : Christophe Calais/Signatures
A rwandan fate
At the end of 1994, the Hutu militiamen responsible for the Rwandan genocide flee to Zaïre, soon followed by Hutu civilians. Guilty or not of participating in the genocide, hundreds of thousands Rwandans wander on the roads, facing hunger and cholera. On July 26 of that year, a child is rescued from being buried alive in a mass grave by a French legionnaire. Since that day, Christophe Calais has followed Angelo's journey. At...

Photos : Christophe Calais/Signatures<br />
A rwandan fate<br />
At the end of 1994, the Hutu militiamen responsible for the Rwandan genocide flee to Zaïre, soon followed by Hutu civilians. Guilty or not of participating in the genocide, hundreds of thousands Rwandans wander on the roads, facing hunger and cholera. On July 26 of that year, a child is rescued from being buried alive in a mass grave by a French legionnaire. Since that day, Christophe Calais has followed Angelo's journey. At the time, the legionnaire and his family want to adopt the boy but aid agencies are able to track Angelo's parents. Instead of leaving for France, Angelo spends two years with his father in a refugee camp in Zaïre. In 1996, a civil war breaks out : father and son, among 500,000 refugees, are forced to return to Rwanda. But for Angelo, the joy of being reunited with his entire family will not last long. Shortly after his return, the boy's father, Léonard, is accused of having participated in the genocide and incarcerated. Angelo will not see his father for the next five years. Christophe Calais will follow Angelo's story in 2002, 2003, 2007 and 2010, date in which he photographs him with his five-year-old girl. In October, 2013, He returns to Rwanda to see Angelo, almost 20 years after their first meeting.